March 2023 streaming preview

Netflix brings another round of original movies this month, including “Shirley” (Netflix, 3/22), a biographical drama from Oscar-winning filmmaker John Ridley and starring Regina King as Shirley Chisholm, the first Black congresswoman. Also debuting are “Spaceman” (Netflix, 3/1), a science fiction drama featuring Adam Sandler in a dramatic role as an astronaut who meets an extraterrestrial on a solitary research mission, and “Damsel” (Netflix, 3/8), a medieval adventure starring Millie Bobby Brown as a princess offered up as a sacrifice to a fire-breathing dragon.

More movies: Ridley Scott’s historical epic “Napoleon” (Apple TV+, 3/1), starring Joachim Phoenix as the conquering emperor, makes its streaming debut;
Timothée Chalamet stars as the young chocolatier in “Wonka” (Max, 3/8), the prequel to the classic movie fantasy from “Paddington” director Paul King;
the hit concert movie “Taylor Swift: The Eras Tour (Taylor’s Version)” (Disney+, 3/15) is expanded from the theatrical release with five additional songs;
and Jake Gyllenhaal takes the lead as a former UFC fighter turned bar bouncer in a remake of “Road House” (Prime Video, 3/21) directed by Doug Liman.

Kate Winslett stars as the leader of an authoritarian Central European nation that begins to crumble behind the walls of the palace in “The Regime” (Max, 3/3), a limited series costarring Andrea Riseborough, Martha Plimpton, and Hugh Grant and directed in part by Oscar-nominated filmmaker Stephen Frears.

“Apples Never Fall” (Peacock, 3/14), a limited series based on the novel by Liane Moriarty, stars Annette Bening and Sam Neill as a couple whose seemingly idyllic life suddenly unravels as their adult children discover the dark secrets they’ve kept hidden.

A young journalist (Melissa Benoist) hits the campaign trail to follow a presidential candidate and becomes one of “The Girls on the Bus” (Max, 3/14) in the new series costarring Carla Gugino as a veteran reporter.

The epic science fiction trilogy by Chinese author Cixin Liu comes to the small screen in the new series “3 Body Problem” (Netflix, 3/21). The sprawling adaptation from “Game of Thrones” showrunners David Benioff and D.B. Weiss jumps all over the globe and stars Rosalind Chao, Liam Cunningham, Eiza González, Benedict Wong, and Jonathan Pryce.

A Jewish family separated in the early days of World War II fights to survive and reunite in “We Were the Lucky Ones” (Hulu, 3/28), a limited series inspired by a true story and adapted from the novel by Georgia Hunter. Joey King and Logan Lerman star.

The limited series “A Gentleman in Moscow” (Paramount+, 3/29), based on the bestselling novel by Amor Towles, stars Ewan McGregor as a Russian count and poet who observes the changing culture of Russian society over the decades after the revolution while under house arrest at the opulent Hotel Metropol.

Netflix

Theo James stars in “The Gentlemen: Season 1” (3/7), a prequel to Guy Ritchie’s gangster film.

Foreign language debuts include the underworld crime thrillers “Furies: Season 1” (France, 3/1) and “Iron Reign: Season 1” (Spain, 3/15) and a new remake of the classic thriller “The Wages of Fear” (France, 3/29).

Max

Jason Momoa returns as the King of Atlantis in “Aquaman and the Lost Kingdom” (now streaming) and Nicolas Cage stars in the surreal comedy “Dream Scenario” (3/15).



Hulu

Two eccentric high school besties discover a portal to the multiverse in the comedy “Davey & Jonesie’s Locker: Season 1” (3/22).

True stories: “The Stones and Brian Jones” (3/14) takes a deep dive into the lost creative genius of The Rolling Stones and “Spermworld” (3/30) looks at the world of sperm donors.

Prime Video

Zac Efron and John Cena stars in the comedy “Ricky Stanicky” (3/7) from filmmaker Peter Farrelly.

The docuseries “Friends in Low Places” (3/7) follows Garth Brooks, Trisha Yearwood, and friends as they set out to build a honky-tonk in the heart of Nashville.

“The Baxters: Season 1” (3/28), based on the book series by Karen Kingsbury, is a drama of faith and family starring Roma Downey and Ted McGinley.

Disney+

The animated series “X-Men ’97: Season 1” (3/20) takes the mutant superhero team back a few decades.

A young woman (Louisa Harland) framed for murder becomes a notorious outlaw in 18th-century England in “Renegade Nell” (3/29).

Apple TV+

The limited series “Manhunt” (3/15) dramatizes the hunt for John Wilkes Booth in the aftermath of Abraham Lincoln’s assassination.

Kristen Wiig plays a woman trying to break into Palm Beach high society in 1969 in the comedy “Palm Royale: Season 1” (3/20), costarring Laura Dern and Allison Janney.

Paramount+

Brian Cox and Kelly Reilly star in “Little Wing” (3/13), a family drama set in the world of pigeon racing.

Peacock

The comic supervillain returns in the animated sequel “Megamind vs. The Doom Syndicate” (3/1) and the spin-off series “Megamind Rules! Season 1” (3/1).

Other services

Giancarlo Esposito stars in the thriller “Parish: Season 1” (AMC+, 3/31) as a New Orleans businessman pulled back in his criminal past.

The two-part mystery “Agatha Christie’s Murder is Easy” (Britbox, 3/1) stars David Jonsson, Penelope Wilton, and Morfydd Clark and “Catch Me a Killer” (Bribox, 3/4), based on a true story, stars Charlotte Hope as South Africa’s first serial killer profiler.

Oscar nominee “American Fiction” (MGM+, 3/8) and “The Boys in the Boat” (MGM+, 3/29), about the underdog 1936 University of Washington rowing team, make their respective streaming debuts.

“The Long Shadow” (AMC+, 3/21), starring Toby Jones and David Morrisey, dramatizes the true story of the hunt for the Yorkshire Ripper in 1970s England.

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Sean Axmaker is a Seattle film critic and writer. He writes the weekly newspaper column Stream On Demand and the companion website, and his work appears at RogerEbert.com, Turner Classic Movies online, The Film Noir Foundation, and Parallax View.

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